Adrianna Patrucco

Born and raised in Perú, Adriana’s work is disciplined through the influence of early contemporary European impressionism and early 20th century Peruvian Indigenist movement such as of José Sabogal and Carlota Carvallo.

These artists have influenced Adriana’s narrative genre inspired by their color schemes reminiscent of Andean folklore. During her time at the School of Art in Lima, Perú, she worked as a professional illustrator publishing more than a dozen children’s books in Perú and in the United States. She enjoys painting at her home in Fayetteville, Arkansas, where she lives with her family and her two cats.

“As an artist, I am seduced by the role of light and shadows on what I paint. For me, they are the main characters of my painting and also its main expressive device. Not only are these portraits a testimony of my family, but also of my personal history. Having grown up in a house full of portraits painted mostly by my grandmother, it was part of my daily life to see different colors, expressions, gestures, and faces. In fact, some of those portraits depicted my family members, but the vast majority of them portrayed the faces of people unknown to me. Curiously, these portraits struck me the most, since, after many years, I realized that a portrait can transcend the depicted person herself, even beyond her own death. Therefore, I think the most relevant feature of a portrait is not necessarily the formal resemblance to the actual model, but the expression, the light, and even the breathing the painter attempts to convey.”